New review of the “Arc” nemesis of science and common sense

posted in: Pseudoscience, Scepticism | 0

Introduction:

Stained glass image of Noah's arc that says not science
Figure 1: Old stained-glass scientific figure? No. This is a depiction of a story.

The Arc Encounter theme park, in Kentucky, is a $100,000,000 tribute to insecurity.  By this I mean that it was built as a flashy pretence to long-debunked pseudoscientific claims.  No, worse than that, it is a façade of truth and pseudoscience plastered onto stories that were previously only considered fables.  These claims assert that dinosaurs lived with people (which would have been scary, but cool).  Also that the entire Earth was inundated by a single flood.  And the linchpin to the whole story: a wooden boat capable of providing long-term safe harbor to two of each animal on the planet was built by a dude (Noah) when he was at least 500 years old!  These stories not, in any stretch of the imagination, scientific (Figure 1).

Brief history of the Arc park:

The Arc Encounter park and its parent organisation, Answers in Genesis, have been, rightfully, admonished for the outrageousness of calling these claims scientific.  And they have also come under scrutiny for prejudiced hiring practices and questionable tax breaks.

A review befitting the Arc:

Thankfully Dan Phelps, the President of the Kentucky Paleontological Society, has recently written a thorough and sufficiently critical review of the Arc Encounter park.  Thereby saving any of us the anguish of touring the world’s most misinformed, expensive and land-locked boat.

Jared Peters

Jared Peters

Jared Peters, PhD, is a geoscientist who specialises in marine sedimentology, marine palaeoglaciology and climate change.
Jared Peters
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Jared Peters, PhD, is a geoscientist who specialises in marine sedimentology, marine palaeoglaciology and climate change.